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Nothing to lose

I was listening to an NPR broadcast driving back from work when one thing caught my ear. The topic of discussion had something to do with the use by US judges and supreme justices of various verses from American POP and Rock culture. One example was the following verse from "Like a Rolling Stone" - a 1965 song by Bob Dylan: "When you ain't got nothing, you got nothing to lose". This sounds all good and dandy, but I think this is just a paraphrase of: "The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains" from the "Manifesto of the Communist Party" by Marx & Engels published in 1848. So, they've got Dylan beat by about 117 years :)

   

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